Family Names

Friday, 2 December 2016

John and Louisa's arrived to Australia prior to 1855, but when?

John lived for 19 years in Victoria before he died after immigrating at the age of 23 in 1853/4[1]

Louisa died in 1901 after having lived in Victoria for 47 years which indicates that she must have also migrated in 1853 or 1854.[2]

John & Louisa married in Oct 1853 in England, so we know they were in England at this time. [3]
 
Their eldest son Thomas is born on 11 Jan 1855 in Waugh Terrace, Bourke Street, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.[4]

They must have migrated shortly afterwards perhaps on the Mary Stoddart which sailed in April 1854 with only a small number of passengers including a Mr & Mrs Williamson (unfortunately first names and ages not listed).

This is the only possible match that I have been able to find  for the couple, the entry reads as follows:
WILLIAMSON ---- MR A
 WILLIAMSON ---- MRS A

It appears that they were travelling with no children and were both over 21. (Note the  “A” stands for adult not their first initial). [5]

Anon., 'SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE' The Argus, 3 April 1854, p.4 . Retrieved December 2, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4805280

There is no Louisa listed on the incoming passenger list at all in either the assisted or unassisted passenger lists for incoming shipping to Victoria in from 1853 to Jan 1855 time period.

Has anyone else found them? I'm desperately looking for help, any ideas of where to look next would be wonderful.

Links

To learn more about John & Louisa Williamson click here

Sources

[1] Death certificate of John Williamson, died 7 Jun 1874, Registrar of Birth, Death and Marriages, Victoria 6427/1874
[2] Death Certificate Louisa Williamson, died 6 Sep 1901, Registrar of Birth, Death and Marriages, Victoria, 9613/1901
[3] Marriage certificate of John Williamson & Louisa Walker married 10 October 1853, General Register Office, England, Dec quarter 1853, Shoreditch registration district, 1c/364/311
[4] Birth certificate of Thomas Williamson, born 11 Jan 1855, Registrar of Birth, Death and Marriages, Victoria, 218/1855
[5] Taken from the Index of Inward Passenger Lists for British and Foreign Ports 1852-1899, MARY STODDART B 066 001.

Sunday, 27 November 2016

Thomas & Jane Williamson born Ireland lived in England

Looking for my 2nd great grand Parents

Little is known about my 2nd great-grandparents other than what I have been able to glean from the English Census. I have not found any record of Thomas or his family in the 1841 census I am assuming that they left Ireland for England after 1841 and arrived before the 1851 census.
However it is possible that Thomas came out first, and because he came out alone we aren’t able to detect him in the 1841 English census.  He may have come out first to find work etc before the family followed. 
Or he may have followed his pregnant daughter/ daughter-in-law out for some reason, and/or he may have gone to stay with her while looking for work. The possibilities are endless ...

What we know from the census records

1851 (Series HO107 Piece: 2435; Folio: 561; Page: 11)
Wood Street, Maryport, Cumberland, England, UK
1. Thomas Williamson, aged 54, Dock labourer
2. Jane Williamson, aged 50,
3. John Williamson, aged 19, Tailor apprentice
4. James Williamson, aged 15, ship carpenter apprentice

1861 (Series RG9, Piece: 3942; Folio: 17; Page: 27)
Nelson Street, Maryport, Cumberland, England, UK
1. Thomas Williamson, aged 60 Labourer
2. Jane Williamson, wife aged 58
3. Jane Williamson, daughter aged 40 unmarried
4. James Williamson, son, aged 23, Ship carpenter
5. James Williamson, gson, aged 8, scholar

1871 (Series RG10, Piece: 5246; Folio: 77; Page: 35)
8 L Court, Nelson Street, Maryport, Cumberland, England, UK
1. Thomas Williamson, aged 70, labourer
2. Jane Williamson, aged 69
I have not been able to find either one of the ageing couple Thomas or Jane in the 1881 Census.


Known children
1. Jane Williamson (born in Belfast Cir 1821 – death date unknown)
2. John Williamson (born in Belfast Cir 1832-died 1874)
3. James Williamson (born in Belfast Cir 1836-Aft 1891)

Their son John Williamson married Louisa Walker in the Holy Trinity Church, Hoxton, Middlesex, England on the 10 Oct 1853.  Soon after the couple migrated to Australia and John eventually set up a tailor shop in St. Kilda, Victoria. I am descended from John Williamson and Louisa Walker.

Summary of Information from the Censuses 

Thomas was born in Belfast, Ireland between 1797 and 1801 based on the various ages he gave in the 1851, 1861 and 1871 English Census. Thomas’s wife, Jane also was born in Belfast, Ireland.  Their known children were from Belfast Ireland; I have always assumed that the couple were also married in Ireland.

Based on the above information I applied for two death certificates as transcribed below:-

Transcription of Thomas Williamson’s death certificate (1872 June Qtr, Vol 10B page 352)

Registration District         Whitehaven
1872 Death in the Sub-district of Harrington in the County of Cumberland
No. 171
When and where died Fifteenth April 1872 Harrington
Name and Surname Thomas Williamson
Sex Male
Age 72 yrs
Yeoman
Cause of Death Paralyses Certified
Signature, description and residence of informant Henry Robison for attendance Harrington
When registered Sixteenth April 1872
Signature of registrar Edward Brydin Registrar

Transcription of Jane Williamson (1876 June Qtr Vol 10B page 372)

Registration District         Whitehaven
1876 Death in the Sub-district of Whitehaven in the County of Cumberland
No. 394
When and where died Twenty second May 1876 65 SAtrand Street
Name and Surname Jane Williamson
Sex Female
Age 77 years
Occupation Widow of John Williamson [--?--]
Cause of Death (Vascular disease of heart)
Signature, description and residence of informant – Jane Musgrave Daughter. Present at the Death 65 Strand Street, Whitehaven
When registered Twenty fourth  May 1876
Signature of registrar  William  [--?--] Hamilton Registrar

Conclusion

Thomas Williamson [death certificate (1872 June Qtr, Vol 10B page 352)] could be my ancestor but I have nothing to corroborate this at present.  Although the ages make a match the occupation does not.
Jane Williamson [death certificate (1876 June Qtr Vol 10B page 372)] is unlikely to be my ancestor as she was the widow of a John Williamson rather than a Thomas Williamson.  The information on the certificate is likely to be correct as her daughter Jane Musgrave provided the details.


So the challenge is where to next? Any ideas?

Wednesday, 23 November 2016

Immortalised in a Poem

A poem published on the 20 Dec 1895 in the North Melbourne Courier and West Melbourne Advertiser featured my great grandparents.[1]    The newspaper article containing the poem compared two jurisdictional Melbourne court approaches to matrimonial cases.  Walter and Martha Todman were not mentioned directly but the preamble contained the words "put-them both in a bag and shake 'em up” an often mentioned quote taken from other newspaper court reports referring to their case. [2]
Figure 1 Ronuj, ‘Permiskus Pars’, North Melbourne Courier and West Melbourne Advertiser, page 3. Accessed 20 November 2016 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article103238468

PERMISKUS PARS column transcribed 

“At Prahran, where Dr. Fetherston is the presiding Solon, it is ruled in court that woman when she marries must accept her bargain for better or worse, and the best thing to do when married people disagree is to "put-them both in a bag and shake 'em up" - literally force them into each others' arms again, so to speak. Apparently it is not only regarding the treatment of the ills of the body, but also those of the spirit, that the medical profession hold views as opposite as the pole.
When mammy wants papa to shout,
And bangs the blessed things about
Unless he does, he'd best go out
And get a blue prescription from
The Doctor ruling at Prahran,
Who, pitying the average man,
Will always do the best he can
To stiffen Poll, if she whacks Tom
In the mouth,
Down South. 
But Polly'll get full leave to flirt,
And pass her boss like so much dirt
When out of doors-and if he's hurt,
Get maintenance apart-if she
Consults the veteran Dr. Lloyd,
Who never gets so much annoyed
As when he cannot well avoid
Subduing his famed chivalry,
In his wrath,
Up North.”[3]

Courts of the Day

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a Solon as
 “a wise and skilful law giver”[4]  
The Solons mentioned were:-

  •  Dr. Lloyd from the North Melbourne court (Up North)
“Dr. Lloyd is known as the Friend of Women - he always leans to the side of the wives rather than to that of the husbands in cases of conjugal difference”[5]  


  • Dr Featherston  from the South Melbourne court  (Down south) 

“Dr. Fetherston is the presiding Solon, it is ruled in court that woman when she marries must accept her bargain for better or worse”[6]
 The different approaches of the two courts is highlighted when a claimant on losing her case in the South Melbourne court vows to take her case to the North Melbourne Court
 “afterwards declared her intention of taking the matter to the North Melbourne Court,” as she would get justice there!”” [7]

 Some interesting phrases of the day and what they mean

“a blue prescription from The Doctor ruling at Prahran”
 “A ‘blue prescription’ refers to a doctor’s prescription pads which were all coloured blue before the advent of computers.” [8]
“Who, pitying the average man, Will always do the best he can To stiffen Poll, if she whacks Tom In the mouth”
 “The meaning of stiffen in this piece is most likely to be ‘punish’, especially given the court context” [9]

 Post-Natal Depression

The preamble of the poem mentions what would probably be referred to as post-natal depression these days  
“treatment of the ills of the body, but also those of the spirit”.  
Could the word “spirit” be referring to post-natal depression? Did my Great grandmother suffer from post-natal depression?  It’s an interesting thought. 

Related Links

The early years of Walter & MarthaTodman's marriage click here

Sources

[1] "PERMISKUS PARS.". (1895, December 20). North Melbourne Courier and West Melbourne Advertiser (Vic. : 1895 - 1913), p. 3. Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article103238468 
[2] "Domestic Troubles", The Argus, 10 December 1895, p. 5. Retrieved November 20 2016  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8883765; "Domestic Troubles", Mount Alexander Mail, 11 December 1895,  p. 2. Retrieved November 20, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article198250800; For Better or Worse, Warragul Guardian,  13 December 1895, p. 2 (Bi-weekly.). Retrieved November 20, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article67446720; Prahran Police Court, The Prahran Telegraph, 14 December 1895, p. 5. Retrieved November 20, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article144631672; Prahran Court, Prahran Chronicle, 14 December 1895, p. 4. Retrieved November 20, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article165213885; Here and There, Warragul Guardian, 20 December 1820, p. 8 (Bi-weekly.). Retrieved November 20, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article67446889
[3] ‘Permiskus Pars’, North Melbourne Courier and West Melbourne Advertiser, 20 December 1895, p. 3. Accessed 20 November 2016 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article103238468
[4] "Solon." Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 30 Nov. 2015.
[5] Anon., ‘Magisterial Humour’, Table Talk, 17 May 1895, p. 13. Retrieved November 27, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article145921427  
Excerpt “Dr. Lloyd is known as the Friend of Women - he always leans to the side of the wives rather than to that of the husbands in cases of conjugal difference - but he never hesitates about publicly rebuking them for their own good when he thinks it desirable to do so. The other day, for instance, he informed a number of ladies conceited in a case of threatening language that it would be better if they stopped at home and minded their own business instead of gossiping, scandalising each other, drinking beer and wasting the time of the court. But in his heart he must have been thankful to them for giving him a chance to deliver one of his characteristic discourses.  It is a well-known fact that wives seeking alimony from their husbands, and women requiring orders of the court for maintenance for their illegitimate children, go to North Melbourne to reside for a time in order to be able to bring their grievances before Dr. Lloyd. And Dr. Lloyd is proud of his reputation in this way.”
[6] ‘Permiskus Pars’, North Melbourne Courier and West Melbourne Advertiser, 20 December 1895, p. 3. Accessed 20 November 2016 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article103238468
[7] Anon., 'People We Know”, Melbourne Punch, 11 April 1895, p. 3.Retrieved November 27, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article178588178
Excerpt “A REPUTATION for consistency is rapidly bringing game to Dr. Lloyd and the North Melbourne Bench. Wives separated from their husbands, and unmarried girls with encumbrances are always sure of sympathy in the Court presided over by the Dr. We recently drew attention to the fact that the North Melbourne Bench had extended its old established business of giving verdicts to lovely women in distress or disgrace. Formerly the maintenance cases were local ones, but latterly the North Melbourne justices have constituted themselves a Court of Appeal from other courts, saying in effect—" If you can't get a maintenance order in any other court give Dr. Lloyd and Co. a trial. Satisfaction guaranteed." There is no necessity to advertise this in the papers, since it appears to be tolerably well known. At the Prahran Court on Monday a woman who had been granted a maintenance order for 25s a week applied for a further grant for her children. The application was refused, and the woman afterwards declared her intention of taking the matter to the North Melbourne Court, "as she would get justice there!" We shall watch with interest the appeal to the gallant and reliable Dr. Lloyd and his brother justices.”
[8] Andrea Buckely to Sandra Williamson, telephone conversation, 12 September 2016
[9] ‘To Stiffen Poll, Mail Bag’, Oz Words, Issue April 2016, p.4. Retrieved November 20 2016 from http://andc.anu.edu.au/sites/default/files/Ozwords%20April%202016.pdf. This article that appeared in “Oz Words” with the response to my query about the meaning of “to Stiffen Poll, if she whacks Tom in the mouth”. A big thankyou to Julia Robinson for her help.

Sunday, 20 November 2016

My Grandfather’s American Waltham Watch Fob Watch

Walter Todman’s fob watch and seal have been handed down through my extended family. Due to word limitations, I will focus on the fob watch and only briefly mention the seal.

The Components of my Grandfather’s Fob Watch

Fob watches can be understood by examining the following components; the watch case, the watch movement (the face and clock components) and the accompanying accessories.

In the late 19th-century watch cases and movements were beginning to be made in standard sizes. This was a precursor to the wrist watch. When a customer bought a Fob Watch they could personalise it, choosing the case and movement separately, designing it to meet their personal needs.

The Watch Case

Closed Watch Case

Figure 1 Craig Todman, Front of Fob Watch, 2016, digital image
The watch has a metal cover that has a gold coloured finish.   The back cover is plain with a lightly indented pattern.  This pattern also forms the background on the front cover onto which is a stamped impression of a shield enclosed by a circle.  
Figure 2 Craig Todman, Engraved lettering close-up, 2016, digital image, cropped and enlarged
A close up inspection of the engraving on the front of the watch reveals the letters “W” and “T” over one another.  It appears that these letters were not part of the original design as they are in quite a different style.   The letters are thought to represent the original owner’s name – Walter Todman.

The inside of the Watch Case


The Double Hunter Pocket Watch Case can be opened from both the front, to read the time, and the back to access the mechanism.[1]  The double case helps to protect the mechanism and the watch face from dust and damage.[2]  They have a side winder at 3 o’clock. 

Figure 4 Craig Todman, inside back cover of fob watch
When the outer back is opened a new set of engraved initials “J.L.T.W.” are revealed. In contrast to the initials engraved on the front of the watch these initials are far more refined even though they are hidden from view. There has been much discussion within the family as to the significance of these initials to Walter Todman.  It is thought that Walter Todman adopted a new name soon after arriving in Australia. His birth name is thought to have been James Lincoln Temple Willoughby, which in part is supported by the initials in this watch.  

The only other markings on the watch are on the inside of the watch back cover which read, “Warranted 5 years. Orient 5648810”. I have not able to find anyone who can tell me the significance of these commercial markings. My theory is they could be the case maker or style and the serial number.

The Watch Mechanism / Movement 

Figure 5. Craig Todman, Watch Mechanism, 2016, digital image (annotated by Sandra Williamson)

Figure 6 . Craig Todman, Watch Face in case with side winder. 2016, digital image (annotated by Sandra Williamson)
My grandfather’s Fob Watch was made in America by the American Waltham Watch Company in Massachusetts. It is a size 14 manufactured in 1897. It is of "Bond St." Grade quality and has the serial number 8145946 marked on the inside.[3]  American Waltham Watch Company, Massachusetts USA was founded in 1850 and was one of the largest watch makers of the 19th Century.[4]   They were one of the first companies to mechanise the process of watch making.

Provenance 

The first owner of the watch is understood to have been Walter Todman, who died at the age of 63.[5]   How Walter  came to own the watch is unknown.  Walter arrived in Australia before 1890 and the watch was manufactured in 1897. It is not known if the watch was a gift from England or purchased in Australia.  The initials J.L.T.W. previously discussed may provide a clue. The working theory is that the J.L.T.W. lettering may have been engraved at the place of purchase, possibly England (where they knew him by this name), as the engraving looks professionally done. We know he changed his name once he arrived in Australia and the W.T lettering on the outside of the case appears to be more crudely done, therefore possibly done at a later date. 

On his death, the watch passed to Walter’s second son Lincoln James Todman.  Traditionally the watch would have been inherited by the eldest living son, Walter Victor. The family story goes that it was passed on to the second son because Walter Victor stole Lincoln’s watch and sold it for monetary benefit and so their mother gave it to Lincoln as a replacement.[6]   Lincoln Todman died suddenly at the age of 32 and the watch was destined to pass to Lincoln’s only son Warwick Todman.[7]   Warwick being only a child was unaware of the watches significance and took it apart to see how it worked.[8]  It was reassembled but has not worked since. It later passed onto the current owner Lincoln’s eldest son Craig Todman.[9]   

Fob Watches accessories 

1. The chain or ribbon  

Any anchoring chain or ribbon is no longer in existence.  
The only photo that the family have of Walter Todman wearing the watch does not easily show these items.  Unfortunately, there are no photos of Lincoln Todman the next owner wearing the watch.

Figure 7 unknown, Walter & Martha Todman, c.1926 taken at or close to the wedding of Arthur Atkinson & their daughter Martha “Ruby” Todman who were married on the 21st  August 1926

2. The Fob seal 

Lincoln Todman had two children his son, Warwick, inherited the watch and his daughter, Judith, inherited the fob seal which would have been worn on the watch chain or ribbon.[10]  The Fob Seal is currently in the possession of Judith’s eldest child (Lincoln’s granddaughter), Sandra. After interviewing family members no one knows anything about the history of the fob seal. It has no hallmarks or manufacture’s markings of any kind. One relative thought it was a Masonic symbol, however, after much investigation this theory has been largely dispelled.  What we do know is the blue tinge on the on the seal’s carnelian agate face is from a small child Diana Culley nee Taylor, trying to make an ink impression of the Roman Lion on the face.[11]  
Figure 8 Sandra Williamson, Fob Seal - front & side view, 2016, digital image

In Conclusion

As an item of jewellery the Fob watch and seal have both a decorative and utilitarian function.  As individual items they are not necessarily valuable but from a family history point of view, they are significant. They give clues to Walter Todman’s name change and are a physical link to past. As the two items, are now being handed down through separate lines, the writing up this article helps to link them together for future generations and aids in maintaining the integrity of the original fob and seal story.  

Sources

[1] "Types Of Pocket Watch Cases - Pocket Watch Emporium". 2016.Pocketwatchemporium.Com. Accessed July 8 2016. http://www.pocketwatchemporium.com/pocket-watch-cases/;  Douglas Stuart, Renaissance Watch Repair . 2016. "Pocketwatch 101 - How To Identify Pocket Watch Case Types".Pocketwatchrepair.Com. Accessed July 9 2016. http://www.pocketwatchrepair.com/how-to/identify-pocketwatch-cases.php 

[2]Waltham Watch Company Records. Baker Library, Harvard Business School. Waltham Watch Company records, 1854-1941 (inclusive), 1854-1929 (bulk) http://iiif.lib.harvard.edu/manifests/view/drs:14133434$2i  

[3] 2016. "Waltham Pocket Watch Information: Serial Number 8145946 (Grade Bd.St.)".Pocketwatchdatabase.Com. Accessed July 9 2016. https://pocketwatchdatabase.com/search/result/waltham/8145946/movement

[4] Waltham Watch Company. Waltham Watch Company records, 1854-1941 (inclusive), 1854-1929 (bulk): A Finding Aid (Mss:598 1854-1929) [Persistent ID: nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HBS.Baker.EAD:bak00120] View HOLLIS Record Baker Library, Harvard Business School

[5] Victorian Death Certificate, District of Prahran, Walter Todman, 1929/15938

[6] Andrea Buckley, in person discussion with author, 2 August 2016

[7] Victorian Death Certificate, District of Terang, Lincoln James Todman, 1938/15005

[8] Judith Williamson, in personal discussion with author, 30 July 2016

[9] Sandra Williamson, personal knowledge of author, 2016

[10] Sandra Williamson, personal knowledge of author, 2016

[11] Dianna Culley, telephone discussion with author, 1 August 2016

Images

Figure 1 Craig Todman, Front of Fob Watch, 2016, digital image

Figure 2 Craig Todman, Engraved lettering close-up, 2016, digital image, cropped and enlarged

Figure 3  Watches, Jewellery and Antique Nice. 2016. "Antique Avalon 12S 25 Year G.F. Double Hunter Case Pocket Watch Case Very Nice". Terapeak. Accessed July 28 2016. http://www.terapeak.com/worth/antique-avalon-12s-25-year-g-f-double-hunter-case-pocket-watch-case-very-nice/262018623797/.  (Annotated by Sandra Williamson)

Figure 4 Craig Todman, inside back cover of fob watch

Figure 5. Craig Todman, Watch Mechanism, 2016, digital image (annotated by Sandra Williamson)

Figure 6 . Craig Todman, Watch Face in case with side winder. 2016, digital image (annotated by Sandra Williamson)

Figure 7 unknown, Walter & Martha Todman, c.1926 taken at or close to the wedding of Arthur Atkinson & their daughter Martha “Ruby” Todman who were married on the 21st  August 1926
Figure 8 Sandra Williamson, Fob Seal - front & side view, 2016, digital image

Friday, 4 November 2016

United British Women’s Emigration Association

Recently I read a Blog Post by Moya Sharp concerning the “United British Women’s Emigration Scheme”  transcribing an article that she had found in the “West Australian” dated the 24 March 1894 to read her original post click here.  The article piqued my interest prompting me to revisit my, albeit limited, research concern the “United British Women’s Emigration Association” and the role that they played bringing young women to Western Australia.

My ancestor Martha Sarah Ellis and her sister Kate Ellen Ellis travelled out to Australia on the SS Nairnshire from England to Perth under auspices of the Association in 1889 (more details about their journey can be found here and here).[1]

In 1894 a report was published entitled the “United British Women’s Emigration Association Report”, contained within the report were interesting titbits on the work of the Association, as shown below.[2]

Figure 1 United British Women's Emigration Association, Report 1894, Winchester: Warren and Son, Printers and Publishers. [Accessed 5 November 2016 http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-52874072] page 7

Figure 2 United British Women's Emigration Association, Report 1894, Winchester: Warren and Son, Printers and Publishers. [Accessed 5 November 2016 http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-52874072], page 10
The newspapers of the day also revealed other interesting material concerning the young women who came across under the scheme of Free Passages sponsored by the West Australian Government.

Figure 3 Anon., 'THE LADIES' COLUMN. SEEKING NEW HOMES', Western Mail, 2 February 1901, p. 36 [Accessed 05 Nov 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article33199584] excerpt 

Figure 4  Anon, 'THE IMMIGRANT GIRLS', Western Mail, 15 October 1897, p. 27. [Accessed 05 Nov 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article33145319] Note Miss Monk who supervised many of the trips of the girls out to Australia – presumably she is the older woman standing on the far left of the photo


There appears to have been a mixed response from the public concerning the newly arrived girls.  Some felt that despite the best efforts of the Association some girls were unsuitable for the life they would eventually find for themselves and were unprepared for what lay before them.  Others were desperate for domestic help or perhaps the opportunity/possibility of finding a wife.





Figure 5 Anon, 'NEWS OF THE DAY.', The Daily News, 16 March 1889, p. 3.,  [Accessed 05 Nov 2016, 05 Nov 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77373635]

Interesting Times.

Images

Figure 1 United British Women's Emigration Association, Report 1894, Winchester: Warren and Son, Printers and Publishers. [Accessed 5 November 2016 http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-52874072] page 7

Figure 2 United British Women's Emigration Association, Report 1894, Winchester: Warren and Son, Printers and Publishers. [Accessed 5 November 2016 http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-52874072], page 10

Figure 3 Anon., 'THE LADIES' COLUMN. SEEKING NEW HOMES', Western Mail, 2 February 1901, p. 36 [Accessed 05 Nov 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article33199584] excerpt  

Figure 4  Anon, 'THE IMMIGRANT GIRLS', Western Mail, 15 October 1897, p. 27. [Accessed 05 Nov 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article33145319] Note Miss Monk who supervised many of the trips of the girls out to Australia – presumably she is the older woman standing on the far left of the photo

Figure 5 Anon, 'NEWS OF THE DAY.', The Daily News, 16 March 1889, p. 3.,  [Accessed 05 Nov 2016, 05 Nov 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77373635]


Sources
[1]  Shipping Records for the ‘Nairnshire’, Page 3 Passenger listing, 8 Oct 1885; Passenger and Crew Lists; Shipping Records for the ‘Nairnshire’; State Records Office, Western Australia. [Copy of the original record provided via email by Tom Reynolds from the State Records Office of Western Australia on 8 February 2013 (Tom Reynolds tom.reynolds@sro.wa.gov.au)Note no reference was given.  Reference  created from known sources]

Thursday, 3 November 2016

The information that an archive holds may not always be correct

Kelly, Vincent, Untitled Photograph of Myrtle Bassett with her older sister Doris Bassett, circa 1922
In 1993 I took my grandmother up to visit her sister in Kiama.  While I was there my 2nd cousin Jeff Carter did an interview with them and took their portrait which he  lodged in the National Library of Australia.

He gave me a copy of this interview and the picture.  Today I was curious and went on a hunt to see if I could find the oral history in the National Library of Australia catalogue.  I was thrilled when I found the entry, the description of the reads as follows:-

"Portrait taken in conjunction with oral history interview with these sisters. Daughters of a gold miner, born in Ballarat, they lived in Tasmania as children and later in Melbourne and rural western Victoria."[1]

I was surprised when I read this description as they only lived in Tasmania for a couple of years. They were both born in Eaglehawk, Eaglehawk, Victoria, Australia[2].  Myrtle in 1907 after which they moved to Tasmania where their brother was born in 1908 but by 1912 the family had returned to Eaglehawk for the birth of their youngest sister Gladys in 1912.[3]

Moral of the story - always check your sources, and never trust any single source.

The photograph at the beginning of this post is of the two sisters when they were young girls/women, the photo that Jeff Carter gave me and that I would have liked to use is, according to TROVE  under copyright until 2080, 70 Years after Jeff's death (he died in 2010).[4]

Sources
[1] Carter, Doris L. & Carter, Jeff. & Sharp, Myrtle M.  1993,  Doris Carter and Myrtle Sharp interviewed by Jeff Carter in the Jeff Carter collection [sound recording] [Audio recording of my great aunt and my grandmother]

[2] Victorian Birth Certificates 1906/2600 Eaglehawk for Doris Lillian BASSETT/MANDERSON and 1907/10233 Eaglehawk for Myrtle May BASSETT/MANDERSON

[3] NAA: B883, VX21203 William BASSETT; Victorian Birth Certificate 1912/19781 Eaglehawk Gladys Irene BASSETT

[4] Carter, Jeff. (1993). Portrait of Mrs. Doris Carter and Mrs. Myrtle Sharp Retrieved November 3, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-136197079

Thursday, 27 October 2016

I am looking for Elizabeth Clarke do you recognise her?

Elizabeth Clarke widow married William Carbis also a widow in 1847 in the Gosford Church of England in NSW.[i]  They were married for sixteen years before William died suddenly of a heart attack in 1863, while working on his sea-going vessel “William & Betsy”.[ii] 

As Elizabeth was a widow when they got married, it is likely then that Clarke was not her maiden name.  Her son William Browster died 26 November 1864, intestate a farmer of Mangrove Creek. In 1865 Elizabeth made an application as his mother to settle the estate valued at £15.[iii]

William Browster/Bouster was her son so it is likely that she shared the same surname as him at some stage.

Possible surnames for Elizabeth are
  1. Her maiden name which is unknown or could have been Browster or Bouster
  2. First - married surname possibly Browster or Bouster - implied
  3. Second  - married widow  surname Clarke - confirmed
  4. Third – married surname Carbis/Carbus – confirmed

William Carbis came to Australia with his father, William Carbis,  and brother-in-law Francis Bassett as convicts.  It is also possible that Elizabeth could have also been a convict however as there are quite a few Elizabeth Clarkes I have not been able to narrow down the field to eliminate those who are not her.

Hoping someone can help. Elizabeth continued to live in Mangrove Creek, her occupation being listed as “dairy” after her son’s death at least until 1877 however very little else is known about her.[iv]  Any help would be greatly appreciated.




[i] Marriage certificate of William Carbis and Elizabeth Clarke, married 20 August 1847, Gosford Parish Church Register, Northumberland County NSW, Australia
[ii] Death Certificate  of William Carbiss, 10 May 1863, Registry of Birth, Death & Marriage NSW, 685/1863;
[iii] NSW Government Gazette 16th Nov 1865. Pg 2594
[iv] Greville’s 1872 Post Office Directory, Mangrove Creek Page 314, Greville’s 1875-77 Post Office Directory Mangrove Creek Page 451

Friday, 21 October 2016

Researchers beware Ancestry incorrect filing can lead to equally incorrect conclusions

Frustratingly I have spent several hours trying to confirm a finding that I had made on Ancestry only to realise that the original records had been misfiled/labelled on the Ancestry website.  

Recently while reviewing records for Convict relatives I discovered what I thought was an original find.  I had located potential evidence that William Carbis the younger had applied to bring his wife out from England to join him in Australia in the dataset entitled “All New South Wales, Australia, Convict Records, 1810-1891”

Find 1

Name:  William Carbis the younger indexed incorrectly on Ancestry as Wm. Carby
Date:     1837-1843
Place:    New South Wales, Australia
Category: Families of Convicts
Title:      Wives and Families of Convicts on Bounty Ships, 1837-1843
Volume Number: 4/4492

Source:- Ancestry, Index entry for William Carbis the younger 59, State Records Authority of New South Wales; Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia; Title: Wives and Families of Convicts on Bounty Ships, 1837-1843; Volume: 4/4492. Accessed 22 October 2016.
(image 4 of 89)

Find 2
Name    William Carbis the younger (as found on page 59) indexed incorrectly on Ancestry as Wm. Carby
Date      6 Nov 1839
Place     New South Wales, Australia
Category Families of Convicts
Title Wives and Families of Convicts on Bounty Ships, 1837-1843
Volume Number  4/4492
(Image 80 of 122)

Source:- Ancestry, Entry for William Carbis the younger page 59, State Records Authority of New South Wales; Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia; Title: Wives and Families of Convicts on Bounty Ships, 1837-1843; Volume: 4/4492. Accessed 22 October 2016.  [note this entry is not for William Carbis’ wife coming over to Australia as a Bounty Passenger as the dataset title would suggest but instead is a listing of Conditional Pardons that have been given Approval by the Secretary of State in Despatch 33]

So what is this database entitled “Wives and Families of Convicts on Bounty Ships, 1837-1843”  made up of?

It would appear that the type of records in the dataset alternate between the following:-
1.       A list of convicts who have applied to have their wives and families brought out to Australia, and looks to be a very rich source of information for any researcher who locates their ancestry amongst the listing.  It is important to note that only the convicts are indexed not their wives (who are listed by the first and maiden names).  The record also gives details of where they are living in England at the time the application was made.
2.       Conditional Pardons that have been given Approval by the Secretary of State organised by year and then Despatch number

The record that I had located was in the list of approved pardons. So back it’s back to the drawing board. 

At this stage I think is quite unlikely that Grace Carbis nee Martins came out to Australia to join her husband.  There are several theories about who she remarried and where she died but nothing as yet has been substantiated.


The moral of the story, take nothing for granted and double check everything!

Establishing which Hulk William Carbis was incarcerated on

William Carbis was transported to Australia in 1816, he was convicted as part of a trio, with his son William Carbis and son-in-law Francis Bassett his.[i]
After having their sentences commuted from death to “Life in NSW” Australia the trio spent many months living on a Hulk before being shipped out on the “Ocean”.[ii]  Finding the details of the Hulk and where they were held proved challenging.  A search on Ancestry in the “Prison Hulk Registers and Letter Books, 1802-1849” brought up 5 results:-

Figure 1 - Search results see below for image credits
At a preliminary glance, it appears there are two father-son duos incarcerated one on the Perseus and the other on the Portland.
Theoretically the results should provide 2 results for each person as outlined below:-
  1. An entry in the Prison Hulk Index Books, that lists the page in the Hulk registers that where a prisoner can be found
  2. The page for a prisoner’s entry in the Hulk Books

Obviously this was not what the case for results found in the above search.  As I was looking for a father-son pair I focused on the first four records.
On examination the only index entries listed in the above search were for the “Portland”, the other referred to a register page for the "Coromandel; Perseus; Laurel”. Both entries for the “Portland”,  pointed to the index book entry for the Carbis father & son pair on page 5 listing Wm Carbis Senr & Wm Carbis Jun?r page 80.[iii]  There is also an entry for Francis Bassett page 79 on the previous page.[iv]  All three accounted for.
In contrast the link for “Coromandel; Perseus; Laurel” took me to an image of the Hulk Register with a “breadcrumb trail”[v] above which read “Perseus > Index>  1801-1836”,
indicating that this page was part of the Perseus Register, page 80. It seemed incredible that both the “Portland” and the “Perseus” listed a William Carbis on page 80.
To establish that the “Perseus” register page was actually a page from the “Portland” register I scrolled back from the page to find the first page of the Register containing page 80 the page I found was the first page of the “Portland’s” Register an excerpt of which can be seen below.[vi]

Figure 2 Excerpt from the first page of the Portland Hulk Register see below for image credits
There was no break in the numbering sequence, as I went backwards so I felt it was reasonable to assume that the “page 80 “ belonged to the “Portland” rather than the “Perseus” register. 
To further confirm my conclusion I went on the hunt for other collaborating records. On FindMyPast I found a different set of records for the Portland – “Portland's Quarterly Account for year 1814-1816” the first page of which read “Report of the Convicts under Sentence of transportation removed from sundry Gaols by command of his Majesty on Board the Portland Hulk Langston Harbour commencing 1st January 1802” This “Portland's Quarterly Account for year 1814-1816” presents its accounts in summarised 3 monthly increments from 1814 to 1816, “records from the accounts held by the Treasury Department ... and detail what provisions, bedding and clothing had been provided for them.[vii]

Figure 3 First page of the “Portland” Third quarter accounts 1815 for image citation see below
The transcribed entry[viii]
No. On S.B
Entry
Name
Discharge
No. Of Days Victualled
Clothing
Bedding
2548
unable to read
William Carbis Snr

Aug 22

53

-
-
2549
unable to read
William Carbis Jnr

Aug 22

53
-
-
2550
unable to read
Francis Bassett
Aug 22

53

-
-

Conclusion

My conclusion is that my fellows were held on the “Portland” Hulk not the “Perseus”, for 53 days at least between  1st July 1815 until 22nd August 1815 which is the period covered by these accounts. At this stage I am unable to confirm when they boarded the “Portland” as I have not been able to locate them in the account books in the preceding quarter which may also include a record of their victualled days.

Further research required:-

This “Portland's Quarterly Account for year 1814-1816” presents its accounts in summarised 3 monthly increments from 1814 to 1816. To find out when our trio boarded the “Portland” we really need to locate in the previous quarter “April to June” and also possibly the first quarter (January to March) of the year as they were sentenced on the 27th March 1816. 
These records should be found in the same record set already consulted if “Portland's Quarterly Account for year 1814-1816” exists for these quarters. However not all the pages are easily readable as many are faded beyond recognition so the task ahead will be daunting if not impossible and will require painstaking patience and work.

Image Credits

Figure 1 - "Ancestry Library Edition". 2016.Search: UK, Prison Hulk Registers and Letter Books, 1802-1849 results for William Carbis Ancestrylibrary.Com. Accessed June 21 2016. Results 1-5 of 5

Figure 2 - Ancestry.com, "Prison Hulk Registers and Letter Books, 1802-1849," database and images, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 Jun 2016); Entries of the first page of the Portland Hulk Register (p.19, Image 11 of 47); Citing Home Office: Convict Prison Hulks: Registers and Letter Books; Class: HO9; Piece: 8.

Figure 3 - Findmypast, "Convict England & Wales, Crime, Prisons & Punishment, 1770-1935" database and images, www.findmypast.com : accessed 21 Jun 2016); Cropped first page of the Portland's Quarterly Accounts for year 1 July 1815 - 30 September 1815,; citing "Portland's Quarterly Account for year 1814-1816" TNA Ref: T 38/310-338


Sources

[i] "Cornwall Assizes," Royal Cornwall Gazette, Falmouth Packet & Plymouth Journal, 22 April 1815, p. 4, col. 1; digital images, British Library Newspapers (http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/ : accessed 21 Jun 2016), The British Newspaper Archive; Ancestry.com, "England & Wales, Criminal Registers, 1791-1892," database and images, Ancestry.com (www.Ancestry.com : accessed 20 Jun 2016); 1815 Entries for  Wm Carbis, Wm Carbis Junr & Francis Bassett (Page 40, Line 2, 3 & 4, image 4 of 29); Original data: Home Office: Criminal Registers, Middlesex and Home Office: Criminal Registers, England and Wales . Class: HO 27; Piece: 11; Page: 40
[ii] Ancestry.com, "Prison Hulk Registers and Letter Books, 1802-1849," database and images, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 Jun 2016); Entries in the Portland Hulk Register for William Carbis Snr, William Carbis Jnr & Francis Bassett (p.80 #2548, 2549 & 2550, Image 43 of 47); Citing Home Office: Convict Prison Hulks: Registers and Letter Books; Class: HO9; Piece:8; Findmypast, "Convict England & Wales, Crime, Prisons & Punishment, 1770-1935," database and images, www.findmypast.com : accessed 21 Jun 2016); entries for Wm Carbis Senr, Wm Carbis Junr & Francis Bassett; citing "Portland's Quarterly Account for year 1814-1816" Series T38 piece number 328.
[iiii Ancestry.com, "Prison Hulk Registers and Letter Books, 1802-1849," database and images, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 Jun 2016); Index Book entries for Francis Bassett (p.4 col.1 Line 21, image 4 of 29); Citing Home Office: Convict Prison Hulks: Registers and Letter Books; Class: HO9; Piece: 8
[iv] Ancestry.com, "Prison Hulk Registers and Letter Books, 1802-1849," database and images, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 Jun 2016); Index Book entries for William Carbis Snr & William Carbis Jnr  (p.5 col.3 Line 30 & 32, image 5 of 29); Citing Home Office: Convict Prison Hulks: Registers and Letter Books; Class: HO9; Piece: 8
[v] Webopedia.com. (2016). What is breadcrumb navigation? Webopedia Definition. [online] Available at: http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/B/breadcrumb_navigation.html [Accessed 8 May 2016]; Gube, J. (2009). Breadcrumbs In Web Design: Examples And Best Practices – Smashing Magazine. [online] Smashing Magazine. Available at: https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2009/03/breadcrumbs-in-web-design-examples-and-best-practices/ [Accessed 8 May 2016].
[vi] Ancestry.com, "Prison Hulk Registers and Letter Books, 1802-1849," database and images, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 Jun 2016); Entries of the first page of the Portland Hulk Register (p.19, Image 11 of 47); Citing Home Office: Convict Prison Hulks: Registers and Letter Books; Class: HO9; Piece: 8.
[vii] Findmypast, "Convict England & Wales, Crime, Prisons & Punishment, 1770-1935" database and images, Findmypast (www.findmypast.com : accessed 21 Jun 2016); Portland's Quarterly Accounts for year 1 July 1815 - 30 September 1815, entries for Wm Carbis Senr, Wm Carbis Junr & Francis Bassett; citing "Portland's Quarterly Account for year 1814-1816" TNA Ref: T 38/310-338
[viii] Findmypast, "Convict England & Wales, Crime, Prisons & Punishment, 1770-1935" database and images, Findmypast (www.findmypast.com : accessed 21 Jun 2016); First page of the Portland's Quarterly Accounts for year 1 July 1815 - 30 September 1815,; citing "Portland's Quarterly Account for year 1814-1816" TNA Ref: T 38/310-338; Findmypast, "Convict England & Wales, Crime, Prisons & Punishment, 1770-1935" database and images, Findmypast (www.findmypast.com : accessed 21 Jun 2016); original data Description of Treasury: Departmental Accounts: Convict Hulks 1802-1831TNA Ref: T 38/310-338